Tag Archives: inclusion

The Gig Economy: Top Talent in a Temporary Role

balancing act photoPer a McKinsey and Co. report titled Independent work: Choice, Necessity, and the Gig Economy, some 162 million people in Europe and the United States—or 20 to 30 percent of the working-age population—engage in some form of independent work. Also known as freelancers, contractors, members of the gig economy or the contingent workforce, this employment style is real and it is here to stay. On November 15, members of an NYHRPS Forum discussed the impact this work model is having on the HR function and the workplace dynamics.
Technology is Enabling the Growth of the Gig Economy
Managing complexity. Being agile and able to quickly respond to change. A wider variety of workplace skill sets than needed in previous years. Companies of all sizes are looking at ways to maximize the blending of a traditional employee workforce and non-traditional working relationships. Technology is a big enabler in creating the gig economy, however, these workforce changes are no longer a nuance to the technology functions. Rather, technology is creating platforms by which to acquire, engage and keep track of the work requirements and work deliverables.
Appropriate Cultural Changes will Ensure the Success of a Contingent Workforce
Key to making such a culture successful is understanding the scope and requirements of the work to be done. From there, leaders can determine how to hire such talent and “the time to competency” for such hires. Competency, however, is not enough. In a team-based organization, the culture is equally critical and the ability of the team to truly succeed is based on levels of trust that encourage creativity as well as an understanding of the corporate brand that will resonate in the work output.
Talent Development – Who Owns What?
The Disney Corporation was mentioned as a company that devotes a lot of time to the orientation and on-boarding of all staff and all contractors. As such, they have achieved a level of consistency in their ability to deliver customer happiness, superior customer experience, and a global brand.
In an environment where job descriptions quickly become obsolete and new specialty areas are demanded, where can members of the contingent workforce be trained? Within the concept of hiring top talent for temporary roles, should people be hired for their aptitude or their proven experience? And, as talent is brought into the business for varied periods of tenure, how does the employer capture and preserve the corporate knowledge that has been transferred in the process? In other words, who owns the training and development functions for temporary talent?
The Evolution of the Workplace
As leaders, we acknowledged that never before has the creation of a workforce planning discipline been more important; the requirements of the work to be done can be approached in such a broad variety of ways. Likewise, never before has the team culture been more important with the C-suite serving as the chief cheerleader of the culture and the facilitator of a team focused on an aligned purpose.

The NYHRPS Forums aim to deliver industry knowledge and thoughtful business considerations to be taken back for debate within our employer and client circles of influence. In closing, we walked away from the Forum thinking about four major categories of conversation that will improve the integration of a contingent workforce.
1. The concept of good work vs good jobs expands the horizon for – who- delivers the outputs. (See John Boudreau article on the Employee vs Contractor Debate
2. A holistic concept of individual aptitude and time to competency presents new options in delivering a truly diverse workforce.
3. “Garbage-in Garbage Out” applies to the onboarding process of today’s contingent workforce. Embracing the contingent worker with the same level of orientation and an understanding of the company ethos is critical to getting the best outputs. Consideration should be given to what, if any, differential is made in the onboarding of employee vs a contractor.
4. Delivery models for health insurance, long term savings and overall benefit programs are changing; while the individual need for these programs remain strongly intact.

I invite you to keep the conversation going by responding to this post and telling me what you are doing to maximize your relationships with those working with you in a gig or contractor relationship.

Generational Diversity in the Workplace; Myths and Realities

Time Flies. Did I Act that way at the age of 22—– YES, you did!

Human tendency looks at each new generation and sees radically different behaviors than those which they themselves expressed. Wharton Business School Professor Peter Cappelli   says that “many managers overemphasize the generational differences, in part, because they forget what it was like to be young themselves.” Is this a true or cynical comment?”

A multi-generational workplace is not a new phenomenon. So what, if anything, is different today?

NYHRPS Forum participants gathered to explore this question on the morning of July 14 when they gathered, under the facilitation of Bo Young Lee, Global Diversity & Inclusion Leader for Marsh LLC.

Across the generations, we hold many common human values and goals. Yet, we view others through a lens that says ‘what experiences have we shared” and in turn, we apply judgments that are often broad brushed and untrue when we see behaviors that appear unfamiliar to us. As a group, the NYHRPS participants agreed that regardless of the common values and goals shared by the five generations living in the 21st Century, the digital natives, born after 1980, is behaviorally different. Technology has allowed them to connect in ways never before experienced and to work fluidly across borders and boundaries to gain access to information in real time to make decisions. techno millenials

Rather than focusing on the wonderful impacts of technology into their/our lives, we focus on the behavioral differences that this younger generation exhibits. Perhaps, we need to take a breath and say “Enough!”

What should HR leaders be doing to create a workplace that supports open communications and understanding across all ages, and builds on the unique values and strengths of each generation?

Bringing diverse groups of people together is not the same as making the individuals feel included. Forum members were asked to consider the way traditional Diversity programs address, or fail to address, the multi-dimensional backgrounds of the individual. Progressive teams are using an intersectional approach which demands that we shift the conversation away from distinct labels and categories to a broader view of the person.

creative-desk-pens-school-mediumImpact: Workforce estimates by 2020 show millennials comprising over 50% of the population, with a profile that includes nearly 40 percent non-white race or ethnicity. Traditional labels no longer apply, and many millennials frown on labeling anyway. (Pew Research in the Deloitte University Press 

Radical Transparency, a concept where there are zero hidden agendas and information is made available to everyone, has become a norm for Millennials.

Impact: With unprecedented access to information, and growing up in a networked world where you can establish a relationship without ever meeting someone, millennials take an approach to trust that differs from previous generations.

Millennials are radically transparent because they want to create a level playing field and trust people intrinsically. They embrace an egalitarian approach to work. Likewise, with this plethora of information available to them, they want to be heard and they want their opinions to be considered — in spite of the years of experience they have yet to live.

Command and Control Organizational Structure vs. Collaborative Structure: Today’s hierarchical pyramid structures are less likely to work for the senior leaders of 2030. How should HR leaders be redefining the way we develop tomorrows’ leaders, given the increasingly diverse global environment?

work structureImpact: Millennials have been brought up in a structured world with hyper scheduled programming. However, within that construct of scheduling and structure, the millennials’ schedule was based on their individual dreams and aspirations. Contrast this with boomers who were raised with a pre-determined structure. (Think daily print newspapers vs real time, self-defined news feeds.)

Does one structure have more accountability? Yes and No. Understanding the specific business line is important as highly regulated industries must include a series of imposed operational requirements to remain in business. That being said, many of today’s most successful initiatives have been exponentially enhanced through collaborative environments where intrinsic motivations, as compared to imposed motivations, lead the business process.

O tempora o mores“, an age old colloquialism from Cicero criticizes present day attitudes and trends. As leaders, we will do ourselves and those from other generation’s justice with an attitude that displays more flexibility toward those we work with. Let patience and learning prevail.